Giveaways Good for Book Clubs

Be Among the First to Read Toni Morrison’s New Novel God Help the Child

A fierce and provocative novel that adds a new dimension to the matchless oeuvre of Toni Morrison.

At the center: a young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love.

There is Booker, the man Bride loves, and loses to anger. Rain, the mysterious white child with whom she crosses paths. And finally, Bride’s mother herself, Sweetness, who takes a lifetime to come to understand that “what you do to children matters. And they might never forget.”

Giveaways Good for Book Clubs

Delicious Biography of the 20st Century’s First Global Celebrity

A lively and provocative double biography of first cousins Eleanor Roosevelt and Alice Roosevelt Longworth, two extraordinary women whose tangled lives provide a sweeping look at the twentieth century.

When Theodore Roosevelt became president in 1901, his beautiful and flamboyant daughter was transformed into “Princess Alice,” arguably the century’s first global celebrity.

Thirty-two years later, her first cousin Eleanor moved into the White House as First Lady. Born eight months and twenty blocks apart from each other in New York City, Eleanor and Alice spent a large part of their childhoods together and were far more alike than most historians acknowledge.

Author Essays Good for Book Clubs

Exclusive Sneak Peek of Signature Kill by David Levien

Flesh. The lone word came to Officer Hawkins’s mind.

“He thumped the cruiser into park and stepped out, one hand wrapped around his six-battery Maglite, the other resting on the butt of his Glock .40 duty weapon,” begins David Levien’s new serial-killer thriller Signature Kill.

“He walked closer, his feet making a slight crunching sound on the grass, crisp with frost. He passed his light over the pile, and what he saw made his mouth go dry. There was a racing in his chest and a sickening drop in his stomach. Sweat popped along his back and crotch as adrenaline hit him hard.

It was a woman’s body, or parts of her body, naked in the night.”
Keep reading . . .

Author Essays Good for Book Clubs

A Real-Life Doctor on Watching Hospital Dramas on TV

“It turns out Grey’s Anatomy got hospital life mostly right. (The call rooms are actually for naps, not necking). But the viewing experience in no way prepared me for the lysergic roller coaster of practicing actual medicine. “

“I was crazy about Grey’s” admits Matt McCarthy, doctor and author of The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly, “and all medical shows, really—because I was dying to know what being a doctor was really like.

Was it that intense? Did physicians ever screw up? Or yell at each other? And did they really hook up in those cramped on-call rooms? I desperately wanted to know . . . . For the first few months, I felt like I was on a tv show, playing the part of a real doctor—one who was well-intentioned but ultimately overwhelmed—and occasionally flattened by the daily tragedy of watching people die.”

Giveaways Good for Book Clubs

Enter for a Chance to Win Signature Kill

A stunning serial-killer novel from David Levien, featuring his acclaimed and indomitable investigator, Frank Behr . . . this is the bigger thriller we’ve been wanting for from Levien.

A young woman’s body is found on a side street in Indianapolis, horrifyingly arranged. Meanwhile, Frank Behr, who is down on his luck and virtually broke, takes on a no-win case to locate a single mother’s wayward daughter who’s been missing for months.

Suddenly Behr feels the two cases may be connected, but he is years removed from his life as a legitimate police officer and has few friends left on the force. His relentless focus has always been his greatest strength . . . and his deepest flaw.

Giveaways Good for Book Clubs

Hilarious Memoir of a Year in the Life of an Almost-Doctor

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly offers a window on to hospital life that dispenses with sanctimony and self-seriousness while emphasizing the black-comic paradox of becoming a doctor: How do you learn to save lives in a job where there is no practice?

In medical school, Matt McCarthy dreamed of being a different kind of doctor—the sort of mythical, unflappable physician who could reach unreachable patients. But when a new admission to the critical care unit almost died his first night on call, he found himself scrambling.

This funny, candid memoir of McCarthy’s intern year at a New York hospital provides a scorchingly frank look at how doctors are made, taking readers into patients’ rooms and doctors’ conferences to witness a physician’s journey from ineptitude to competence.

Bonus Book Content Good for Book Clubs

Start Reading The Cake House, An Urban Reinvention of a Shakespearean Tale

The Cake House is a gem of a novel: a mystery wrapped in a cloak of family dysfunction with subtle Shakespearean.

“Rosaura is a heroine with spunk and a vulnerability so endearing I missed her the second I closed the book,” says —Elizabeth Flock, author of Me & Emma and What Happened To My Sister. “Salom has written a dazzling coming-of-age tale that will resonate long after you reach the end.”

Start reading this tense, shocking, and seductively dark book. It’s a literary mystery, a unique coming-of-age tale, and a ghost story like no other.

Bonus Book Content Good for Book Clubs

Discover Where Jane Smiley’s Early Warning Began In This Excerpt of Some Luck

Early Warning continues Jane Smiley’s extraordinary epic trilogy, a gorgeously told saga that began with Some Luck and will span a century in America.

Dive into this excerpt of Some Luck (the first book in the trilogy) to discover where it all began!

“Walter Langdon hadn’t walked out to check the fence along the creek for a couple of months—now that the cows were up by the barn for easier milking in the winter, he’d been putting off fence-mending—so he hadn’t seen the pair of owls nesting in the big elm. The tree was half dead; every so often Walter thought of cutting it for firewood, but he would have to get help taking it down, because it must be eighty feet tall or more and four feet in diameter. And it wouldn’t be the best firewood, hardly worth the trouble.”