In fifteenth-century Rome, the Borgia family is on the rise. Lucrezia’s father is named Pope Alexander VI, and he places his daughter and her brothers Cesare, Giovanni, and Goffredo in the jeweled splendor—and scandal—of his court.

From the Pope’s affairs with adolescent girls, to Cesare’s dangerous jealousy of anyone who inspires Lucrezia’s affections, to the ominous birth of a child conceived in secret, no Borgia can elude infamy. Book Two of The Borgias series continues with the story of Lucrezia: Some said she was an elegant seductress. Others swore she was an incestuous murderess.

Empire of Sin has been named a Publishers Weekly Top Ten History Book for Fall 2014. If you loved Erik Larson’s bestseller The Devil in the White City you must pick up this book!

From bestselling author Gary Krist, Empire of Sin is a vibrant and immersive account of New Orleans’ other civil war, at a time when commercialized vice, jazz culture, and endemic crime defined the battlegrounds of the Crescent City.

Empire of Sin re-creates the remarkable story of New Orleans’ thirty-years war against itself, pitting the city’s elite “better half” against its powerful and long-entrenched underworld of vice, perversity, and crime.

By the time I was on the doorstep of thirty, I was in a job I’d grown to hate and had been married for four steady, if plodding, years to my college boyfriend Andrew.

“Sweet, predictable Andrew. While he had once been a wildly hilarious partier up for any crazy scheme at a moment’s notice,” writes Jessica Dorfman Jones, “now he loved nothing more than a night spent at home reading quietly and turning in early.

I tried my best to be equally content with his vision of a cozy and homely pas de deux, but inevitably, at least once a year, I would wind up running into the night to kick up my heels.”

For the author of Barracuda, inspiration comes from books – and classic cinema.

“Books come first but all the other arts also inspire and challenge a writer,” says Christos Tsiolkas.

“I recall seeing Breathless as a teenager, and the shock of Godard’s experimentation was so powerful that I could hardly get up from my seat at the end. The film introduced the jump cut into cinema, and the jump cut has been an important way for me to think about my own writing.”

“Afghanistan is considered to be the worst place on earth to be a woman, according to the U.N. It’s also the most dangerous place to be a woman. Why is that?”

A bacha posh (literally translated from Dari as “dressed up like a boy”) is a third kind of child – a girl temporarily raised as a boy and presented as such to the outside world.

Jenny Nordberg, the reporter who broke the story of this phenomenon for the New York Times, constructs a powerful and moving account of those secretly living on the other side of a deeply segregated society where women have almost no rights and little freedom.

“The first time I heard the name Cacciamani I was five years old. My father said it, and then he spit.”

So begins Jeanne Ray’s Julie and Romeo. Romeo Cacciamani and Julie Roseman are rival florists whose families have hated each other for as long as anyone can remember, yet no one can remember why. When the two meet at a small business owners’ seminar, an intense and unwavering attraction blooms between them.

Unsure of what fate has in store, but deeply in love, Julie and Romeo are not about to let something as silly as a generations-long feud stand in their way.