• The cover of the book T-Rex Trying

    T-Rex Trying

    This book—the third in the T-Rex Trying series—is just so darn cute. Flip through the pages and find a T-Rex ever-so-sincerely attempting to do things that require longer arms and a more human brain. Hailing a cab, playing the bagpipes, applying sunscreen, riding horses… the list of impossible tasks goes on and on. It’s an amusing blend of sweet, dark, and funny.

     
  • The cover of the book My Drunk Kitchen Holidays!

    My Drunk Kitchen Holidays!

    It’s time to celebrate: a new My Drunk Kitchen is here! This edition is all about the holidays, from New Year’s to Dog Day to Champagne Day, and a bunch of celebratory days in between. YouTube star Hannah Hart incorporates activities and hilarious personal anecdotes along with her recipes, making it a cookbook to keep you celebrating all year long.

     
  • The cover of the book The Goldblum Variations

    The Goldblum Variations

    Do you love Jeff Goldblum? Maybe you grew to love him in Jurassic Park or The Fly. Or maybe The Big Chill or—dare I say—Thor: Ragnarok came to mind. No matter the role, Goldblum’s personal brand is ultra-likable, and this genre-defining love letter of a book reminds us of just that.

     
  • The cover of the book How To

    How To

    The newest book from the creator of the webcomic xkcd is full of terrible ideas for tackling basic tasks, including jumping really high, digging a hole, throwing things, and mailing a package. Munroe’s signature stick-figure illustrations demonstrate each comical scenario. The disclaimer reads “Do not try any of this at home.”

     
  • The cover of the book Everything I Need to Know I Learned from Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Everything I Need to Know I Learned from Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Unwrap this gem and expect a collective round of nostalgic “awwwws.” Anyone who grew up watching Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood will treasure this collection of Mister Rogers’s most inspirational quotes paired with sweet illustrations. It’s perfect for sentimental adults in need of a pick-me-up, and it’s a lovely read for kids, too.

     
  • The cover of the book How to Talk to Your Cat About Gun Safety

    How to Talk to Your Cat About Gun Safety

    If your White Elephant group includes liberal-leaning folks, the satirical How to Talk to Your Cat About Gun Safety will surely be a hit. Expect entertainingly silly takes on some of the most timelessly divisive topics, including (but certainly not limited to) evolution, puberty, and post-apocalyptic survival—and expect, of course, lots of cats.

     
  • The cover of the book Poorlier Drawn Lines

    Poorlier Drawn Lines

    Reza Farazmand’s Poorly Drawn Lines was a New York Times bestseller, and his webcomic has been inspiring chuckles for over a decade. Now, he’s back with a timely new installment that reflects on the strangeness of the world we live in. Nothing is off-limits, and that’s what makes it so funny.

     
  • The cover of the book That Was Awkward

    That Was Awkward

    The New Yorker’s Emily Flake takes a lighthearted deep-dive into the common horrors of embarrassing physical contact—including, of course, awkward hugs—what these interactions can signify, and what they feel like. (That is, very, very awkward.) It happens to everyone, Flake reminds us, and we might as well laugh about it.

     
  • The cover of the book The Golden Girls: 'Twas the Night Before Christmas

    The Golden Girls: 'Twas the Night Before Christmas

    Let’s face it, there’s probably at least one Golden Girls fan at the holiday party, and that person will be so glad you brought Blanche, Dorothy, Rose, and Sophia along with you in this little picture-book package. This rhyming riff on ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas will have the recipient thanking you for being a friend.

     
  • The cover of the book Stuff White People Like

    Stuff White People Like

    Lander’s satirical collection compiles the things that white people stereotypically enjoy, from coffee to farmer’s markets to general “awareness.” In Salon‘s words, “It gently mocks the habits and pretensions of urbane, educated, left-leaning whites, skewering their passion for Barack Obama and public transportation (as long as it’s not a bus).”