Thriller/Suspense/Mystery | Read It Forward

Thriller/Suspense/Mystery

Read It Forward features bestselling and up-and-coming authors of thriller, suspense, and mystery. For readers who love books that keep you turning pages late into the night!

New York is toxic—decimated by a dirty bomb years ago. The limnosphere is a virtual safe haven—if you’re rich enough to buy in. Spademan is a hit man—box-cutter at the ready.

His latest job is to snuff out Lesser, a lowlife lurking around other people’s fantasies. As Spademan is about to close the deal, Lesser comes back from the limn with a wild claim: terrorists are planning to attack New York. Again. This time from the inside out.

Spademan has always had his share of enemies, but now they’re coming at him from all sides and it’s impossible to know whom to trust.

How important is a book’s genre? If you’re not a big scifi reader, will you try a science fiction novel if it comes highly recommended? Why or why not? Let’s talk in the comments.

The Martian by Andy Weir has been called “scifi for people who don’t usually read scifi.”

The Associated Press says it well: “it’s a story for readers who enjoy thrillers, science fiction, non-fiction, or flat-out adventure [and] an authentic portrayal of the future of space travel.” Plus, the narrator is hilarious.

The unrelenting hero of The Summer of Dead Toys, Inspector Hector Salgado returns in another riveting crime thriller.

For the second time in a short period, Inspector Hector Salgado turns his head suddenly, convinced someone is watching him, but he sees only anonymous and indifferent faces.

It is January 5, the night before Reyes, though no one would think so judging by the pleasant temperature, ignored by some strollers conveniently dressed in overcoats, some even with gloves and scarf as befits the season, happy to participate in a sham of winter lacking the main ingredient: cold.

Vanessa Michael Munroe returns! The informationist, chameleon, and hunter who has built her life on a reputation for getting things done—often dangerous and not-quite-legal things.

In the wake of going head-to-head with international sex traffickers in The Doll, Munroe has retreated to Djibouti, where, while passing as a man, she finds work as an interpreter for a small, private, maritime security company. On the run, wounded, without connections or resources, and with the life of the captain as bait and bartering chip, Munroe believes that the only way to save Leo, assuming he’s still alive, is to hijack the ship back.

I filed away these stories, fascinated by the deception and heartache hidden within seemingly normal lives.

“[My years working as a private investigator] proved invaluable when writing my new novel Until You’re Mine,” says Samantha Hayes, “although it wasn’t until many years after I left the job that I was ready to write my experiences into novels, weaving stories around the matured ideas.”

“I like to think of my books as “real-life fiction,” making my readers think: What if this happened to me? What would I do in that situation?”

“My favorite summertime hobby was stunning ants and feeding them to spiders,” reveals Gillian Flynn.

My point is not that I was an odd kid (although looking at this on paper now, I worry). Or that I was a bad kid (here’s where I tell you — for the sake of my loving parents — that I had enjoyed happy wonder years back in good old Kansas City).

But these childhood rites of passage — the rough-housing, the precocious sexuality, the first bloom of power plays — really don’t make it into the oral history of most women. Men speak fondly of those strange bursts of childhood aggression, their disastrous immature sexuality. They have a vocabulary for sex and violence that women just don’t. Even as adults.