Thriller/Suspense/Mystery | Read It Forward

Thriller/Suspense/Mystery

Read It Forward features bestselling and up-and-coming authors of thriller, suspense, and mystery. For readers who love books that keep you turning pages late into the night!

The Marauders is so damned good you won’t believe it’s a first novel,” says Stephen King.

“By the time you reach page 20, you won’t care. It’s rollicking, angry, eye-popping, and fall-on-the-floor funny, sometimes in the course of a single scene. The cast is winning, the post-Katrina bayou setting is richly evoked, the dialogue crackles, and the story rolls on a wave of invention.

It’s a little Elmore Leonard, a little Charles Portis, and very much its own uniquely American self. Basically, Tom Cooper has written one hell of a novel.”

From the two-time Booker Prize winner: an exhilarating, exceedingly timely new novel–at once dark, suspenseful, and seriously funny–that journeys to the place where the cyber underworld collides with international power politics.

When Gaby Baillieux released the Angel Worm virus into Australia’s prison system, hundreds of asylum seekers walked free. And because the Americans run the prisons – as they do so many parts of her country – the doors of some 5,000 jails in the US also opened.

Was this a mistake, or a declaration of cyber war?

New York is toxic—decimated by a dirty bomb years ago. The limnosphere is a virtual safe haven—if you’re rich enough to buy in. Spademan is a hit man—box-cutter at the ready.

His latest job is to snuff out Lesser, a lowlife lurking around other people’s fantasies. As Spademan is about to close the deal, Lesser comes back from the limn with a wild claim: terrorists are planning to attack New York. Again. This time from the inside out.

Spademan has always had his share of enemies, but now they’re coming at him from all sides and it’s impossible to know whom to trust.

How important is a book’s genre? If you’re not a big scifi reader, will you try a science fiction novel if it comes highly recommended? Why or why not? Let’s talk in the comments.

The Martian by Andy Weir has been called “scifi for people who don’t usually read scifi.”

The Associated Press says it well: “it’s a story for readers who enjoy thrillers, science fiction, non-fiction, or flat-out adventure [and] an authentic portrayal of the future of space travel.” Plus, the narrator is hilarious.

The unrelenting hero of The Summer of Dead Toys, Inspector Hector Salgado returns in another riveting crime thriller.

For the second time in a short period, Inspector Hector Salgado turns his head suddenly, convinced someone is watching him, but he sees only anonymous and indifferent faces.

It is January 5, the night before Reyes, though no one would think so judging by the pleasant temperature, ignored by some strollers conveniently dressed in overcoats, some even with gloves and scarf as befits the season, happy to participate in a sham of winter lacking the main ingredient: cold.

Vanessa Michael Munroe returns! The informationist, chameleon, and hunter who has built her life on a reputation for getting things done—often dangerous and not-quite-legal things.

In the wake of going head-to-head with international sex traffickers in The Doll, Munroe has retreated to Djibouti, where, while passing as a man, she finds work as an interpreter for a small, private, maritime security company. On the run, wounded, without connections or resources, and with the life of the captain as bait and bartering chip, Munroe believes that the only way to save Leo, assuming he’s still alive, is to hijack the ship back.