“In writing historical novels, I’ve come to feel that I’ve jumped the fence, so to speak, taking on the role of literary tomb raider,” writes Kieran Shields, author of The Truth of All Things. “Less gruesome than actual grave robbing, sure, but the same idea. Sneaking across hallowed ground, rummaging about for earthly remains and lost treasures – even if here those amount to no more than bits and pieces of what made these vanished lives real. It’s finding those bits and shining a long absent light on them that’s such an enjoyable challenge for me as a writer. That feeling, of standing crowbar in hand at the tomb door while the intrepid reader peers over one shoulder, lamp held high against the night, came to life for me in writing The Truth of All Things.”

Emmy-nominated actor, producer and television icon John Stamos (“Glee,” “ER”) returns to the small screen in the Lifetime Original Movie, Secrets of Eden, co-starring Anna Gunn (“Breaking Bad,” “The Practice”). Based on Chris Bohjalian’s New York Times bestselling novel, Secrets of Eden unveils the shocking secrets and facades of happiness that reside within a small, close-knit town after a gruesome tragedy occurs. RIFers in book groups! Here’s a cool idea for a very special discussion: read Chris Bohjalian’s bestselling novel Secrets of Eden and watch the Lifetime Original Movie Secrets of Eden and discuss them together. Sure to be a lively conversation!

We’re giving away copies of Rosamund Lupton’s thriller Afterwards well in advance of its April 24, 2012 release, which means you could be among the very first readers in the U.S. to enjoy this the highly anticipated follow-up to Lupton’s bestselling debut Sister. As always, fill out the form to enter for your chance to win a copy. But wait, there’s more! If you’ve ever received a book from Read It Forward, we want to hear from you! We’re gathering SuperRIFers – Read It Forward “superfans” who Read It First and Pass It On. SuperRIFers love to read and share what they read online. To thank you lovely big-mouthed members of our community, we’re giving SuperRIFers advance access to some of our most popular books.

Sister was an instant bestseller in the U.K. and quickly climbed the bestseller lists in the U.S. as well. The New York Times compared Rosamund Lupton to Kate Atkinson, Patricia Highsmith, and Ruth Rendell, and called Sister “both tear-jerking and spine-tingling.” But don’t just take the New York Times’ word for it! We all know that a recommendation from a friend is the best way to find a great new read. Your fellow RIFers are smart, voracious readers like you, and they have great things to say about Sister. Enjoy excerpts of just a few of the amazing reviews RIFers shared with us. Read It First and Pass It On!

Fans of The Art of Racing in the Rain, get ready for a memoir that Garth Stein calls “stunning . . . an incredible journey, both inward and outward.” Read It Forward favorite Pam Houston, author of Contents May Have Shifted and Cowboys Are My Weakness, says Cheryl Strayed’s memoir Wild “is a big, brave, break-your-heart-and-put-it-back-together-again kind of book. Cheryl Strayed is a courageous, gritty, and deceptively elegant writer. She walked the Pacific Crest Trail to find forgiveness, came back with generosity – and now she shares her reward with us. I snorted with laughter, I wept uncontrollably; I don’t even want to know the person who isn’t going to love Wild. This is a beautifully made, utterly realized book.”

“We need to have head shots but, being writers, we don’t want to pay for them,” says Stephen Gallagher, author of The Bedlam Detective. “Sometimes your publisher will commission some publicity stills but that doesn’t always work out – Hodder & Stoughton once sent me to a man who specialized in photographing fruit for Marks & Spencer. Maybe they chose him because of the “&”. I don’t know what fruit he had in mind when he studied me – maybe Zombie Cucumber. We took the shots in his attic, with me lurking behind a wormy pillar or looking out around a peeling chimney wall. The result: I looked like a ghoul in the fourth stage of something terminal.”