Author Essays Good for Book Clubs

Start Reading The Room by Jonas Karlsson

Critics say The Room is Franz Kafka meets Melville’s ‘Bartelby, the Scrivener’ with a dash of the film Brazil thrown in.

Bjorn is a compulsive, meticulous bureaucrat who discovers a secret room at the government office where he works–a secret room that no one else in his office will acknowledge. When Bjorn is in his room, what his co-workers see is him standing by the wall and staring off into space looking dazed, relaxed, and decidedly creepy.

Bjorn’s bizarre behavior eventually leads his co-workers to try and have him fired, but Bjorn will turn the tables on them with help from his secret room.

Your Reading Life Good for Book Clubs

The Sex Lives of Siamese Twins Will Make You Laugh (and Cringe a Little If You’re an American)

Do you think a writer – like Irvine Welsh, who is from the U.K. writing about the U.S. – has a different perspective on American culture?

It’s always interesting to get the perspective of someone from another country, especially when it comes to our own popular culture. Things that we take for granted are thrown into stark contrast for someone who didn’t grow up here.

That’s certainly the case with The Sex Lives of Siamese Twins by Irvine Welsh. He’s the author behind the iconic book and film Trainspotting – he now lives in the U.S. and has turned his comic wit on American culture. As the Financial Times pointed out, “the excitement of Welsh’s writing derives from the perverse glee he takes in our lowest obsessions.”

Your Reading Life Good for Book Clubs

Why I Go to Facebook to Decide What to Read Next

For me, choosing my next read is an exercise fraught with equal parts trepidation and eager anticipation.

Thing is: I’ve usually just finished reading something I loved and am feeling deeply satiated yet slightly maudlin over its ending, which makes the selection of a new book read feel very weighted.

Unfortunately, I rely increasingly less on traditional reviews in all the places I used to go, like The New York Times, for instance. It’s not because I don’t still value them; it’s just, sadly, a lack of time. The continual flow of recommendations Amazon sends me based on algorithms developed by what I download on my Kindle are very hit or miss. And I don’t keep up on Goodreads in the way that I used to as much either. Who has time for Facebook and yet another social media hub?

Giveaways Good for Book Clubs

Enter for Your Chance to Win The Room

Funny, clever, surreal, and thought-provoking, this Kafkaesque masterpiece introduces the unforgettable Bjorn, an exceptionally meticulous office worker striving to live life on his own terms.

Bjorn is a compulsive, meticulous bureaucrat who discovers a secret room at the government office where he works–a secret room that no one else in his office will acknowledge. When Bjorn is in his room, what his co-workers see is him standing by the wall and staring off into space looking dazed, relaxed, and decidedly creepy. Bjorn’s bizarre behavior eventually leads his co-workers to try and have him fired, but Bjorn will turn the tables on them with help from his secret room.

Debut author Jonas Karlsson doesn’t leave a word out of place in this brilliant, bizarre, delightful take on how far we will go – in a world ruled by conformity–to live an individual and examined life.

Giveaways Good for Book Clubs

Enter for Your Chance to Win The Sex Lives of Siamese Twins by Irvine Welsh

The famed—some would say notorious—author of Trainspotting and many other brilliant offenses against common literary decency comes at last to America, with a dark and twisted tale of personal training and abject codependency in the fading glitter of Miami’s South Beach.

When Lucy Brennan, a Miami Beach personal-fitness trainer, disarms an apparently crazed gunman chasing two frightened homeless men along a deserted causeway at night, the police and the breaking-news cameras are not far behind. Within hours, Lucy becomes a hero. Her celebrity is short-lived, though: the “crazed gunman,” turns out to be a victim of child sexual abuse and the two men are serial pedophiles.

Author Essays Good for Book Clubs

Literary Thriller Fans! Start Reading Uncle Janice

“Matt Burgess does not sleep for one sentence. Neither will you,” says one critic. Uncle Janice has been called “an addictive read.” What makes a book hard for you to put down? Tell us in the comments!

It just doesn’t get much better than this. Carl Hiassen compared Matt Burgess to Richard Price … and then Richard Price wrote this: “Uncle Janice is a lowdown masterful contribution to Urban American lit, charismatically written with terrific sly humor and a joyous dead-on ear. An addictive read, one of those books you wish would never end.”

Start reading … you’ll be hooked!

Giveaways Good for Book Clubs

You Could Win Signed Books from Chris Pavone and a Gift Certificate to Your Favorite Book Store

Stephen King said of The Accident, “If you like real nail-biters, this is the best one so far this year. . . . Couldn’t put the damn thing down.”

To celebrate the January 6, 2015 paperback release of Chris Pavone’s New York Times bestselling novel The Accident, Broadway Books is offering two prizes, including a $200 gift card to your favorite bookstore and signed copies of The Expats and The Accident!

In The Accident, the action rockets around a book called … The Accident. The rich cast of characters—in publishing and film, politics and espionage—are all forced to confront the consequences of their ambitions, the schisms between their ideal selves and the people they actually became. An intricate web of duplicities stretches back a quarter-century to a dark winding road in upstate New York, where the shocking truth about the accident itself is buried.

Author Essays Good for Book Clubs

A Daughter Discovers Her Manic-Depressive Father’s Secret Manuscript

When we offered up Advance Reader’s Copies of He Wanted the Moon, many of you shared touching stories of your own family’s experience living with mental illness.

“When my father’s manuscript begins,” writes Mimi Baird, “he is forty years old and has lived with the diagnosis of manic depression for more than ten years. By now, he knows very well the symptoms of his disease, its dangerous, ecstatic highs followed by pitch-dark depressions.

It is February 1944, and he has retreated to the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Boston, as he often did when he felt himself becoming manic, in order to protect his family from his increasingly erratic behavior.”